Common Diagnoses:
Bunionette

Overview

Bunionette, is a prominence of the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe. The metatarsals are the five long bones of the foot. The prominence that characterizes a tailor’s bunion occurs at the metatarsal “head,” located at the far end of the bone where it meets the toe. Tailor’s bunions are not as common as bunions, which occur on the inside of the foot, but they are similar in symptoms and causes.

Symptoms

The symptoms of tailor’s bunions include redness, swelling, and pain at the site of the enlargement. These symptoms occur when wearing shoes that rub against the enlargement, irritating the soft tissues underneath the skin and producing inflammation.

Diagnosis

Tailor’s bunion is easily diagnosed because the protrusion is visually apparent. X-rays may be ordered to help the foot and ankle surgeon determine the cause and extent of the deformity.

Treatment

Your foot and ankle surgeon may select one or more of the following non-surgical therapies:

Shoe modifications. Choose shoes that have a wide toe box, and avoid those with pointed toes or high heels.
Padding. Bunionette pads placed over the area may help reduce pain.
Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may help relieve the pain and inflammation.
Icing. An ice pack may be applied to reduce pain and inflammation. Wrap the pack in a thin towel rather than placing ice directly on your skin.
Injection therapy. Injections of corticosteroid may be used to treat the inflamed tissue around the joint.
Orthotic devices. In some cases, custom orthotic devices may be provided by the foot and ankle surgeon.Injection therapy.
If you continue to have problems after non-surgical treatment, your foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeon may recommend surgery. The goals of this surgery are to remove the bony prominence and correct alignment to decrease pain.